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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

3 edition of Growth and equality in rural China found in the catalog.

Growth and equality in rural China

Keith B. Griffin

Growth and equality in rural China

by Keith B. Griffin

  • 68 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Asian Employment Programme, ARTEP, Distributed by Maruzen Asia in [Bangkok], Singapore .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China
    • Subjects:
    • China -- Rural conditions

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementby Keith Griffin and Ashwani Saith.
      ContributionsSaith, Ashwani.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHN733.5 .G74 1981
      The Physical Object
      Pagination166 p. ;
      Number of Pages166
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3154003M
      ISBN 109221024229
      LC Control Number82920069

      2. Political status in rural China The two most important forms of political status in rural China are membership in the Communist Party and holding a cadre position. The Communist Party is an influential organizational network that extends from Beijing down through the provinces, counties, and townships to the villages. Party members belong to a. Data and research on social and welfare issues including families and children, gender equality, GINI coefficient, well-being, poverty reduction, human capital and inequality., Evidence on income distribution and poverty in OECD countries since the mids, using data that correct for many of the features that limit cross-country and intertemporal comparisons in this field.

      China has been the most rapidly growing economy in the world over the past 25 years. This growth has fueled a remarkable increase in per capita income and a decline in the poverty rate from 64 percent at the beginning of reform to 10 percent in   China has implemented a couple of social development programs in rural areas since , including universal compulsory education up to grade 9, rural medical cooperative system, social pension system for rural residents, and a minimum living allowance scheme.

      in China, and has attracted most attention from researchers so far. Some 60% of income inequality in China is attributed to the rural-urban disparities (Sicular et al. , Chen et al. 1 GDP growth (annual %), World Development Indicators, the World Bank, 2 National Bureau of Statistics of China, Did higher inequality impede growth in rural China? (English) Abstract. This paper estimates the relationship between initial village inequality and subsequent household income growth for a large sample of households in rural China. Using a rich longitudinal survey spanning the years , and controlling for an array Cited by:


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Growth and equality in rural China by Keith B. Griffin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Growth and equality in rural China. [Bangkok]: Asian Employment Programme, ARTEP ; Singapore: Distributed by Maruzen Asia, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, International government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors /. Downloadable. In the past two decades, China has achieved world renown for reducing rural poverty.

However, it is becoming harder to reduce poverty and inequality further in China, even though its economy continues to grow. This report compares the impact specific rural public investments can have on promoting growth and reducing poverty and inequality.

In the past two decades, China has achieved world renown for reducing rural poverty. However, it is becoming harder to reduce poverty and inequality further in China, even though its economy continues to grow.

This report compares the impact specific rural public investments can have on promoting growth and reducing poverty and inequality. It is a well-known fact that China is one of Asia’s -and the world’s- wealthiest nations. In the past two decades, China has made strides in eliminating poverty by reducing 60 percent of the population living in extreme poverty in to 10 percent in However, using the Gini coefficient, an inequality measurement that ranges fromwhere 0 means complete economic equality and 1.

Get this from a library. Did higher inequality impede growth in rural China?. [Dwayne Benjamin; World Bank.] -- This paper estimates the relationship between initial village inequality and subsequent household income growth for a large sample of households in rural China.

Using a. Gender Inequality and Economic Growth in Rural China Article in Social Science Research 29(4) December with Reads How we measure 'reads'. The research for this article was funded by National Science Foundation Grant SES Earlier versions were presented at The Market Transition Debate: Between Socialism and Capitalism, UCLA, ; the ISA Conference on Stratification, Ann Arbor, Michigan, August 13–14, ; and at the 90th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, session on stratification Cited by: China has undertaken broad reforms in both the urban and rural sectors, and its record of growth has been enviable.

The reforms have been implemented by rank-and-file cadres who potentially stood to lose in the process, and so could have stymied efforts to liberalize the by: The Evolution of Income Inequality in Rural China dwayne benjamin and loren brandt University of Toronto john giles Michigan State University I.

Introduction China has recorded impressive growth over the past 20 years, with a com-mensurate increase in average living. Sonali Jain-Chandra published a striking chart on income inequality in China on the IMF blog – which is based on a recently issued working shows that the Gini coefficient has risen by 15 points since to that is a big change, even though some increase in inequality could have been expected as the level of development improved.

The mechanisms appear to be tolerated as the fruits of growth are shared fairly equitably, thus allowing implementation of a politically and economically self-reinforcing reform process. Keywords: Economic transition; China; Political economy; Inequality; Rural reformCited by:   As China experienced rapid economic growth in the mids, it also faced an accompanying downside: a widening income gap.

Today, even while the economy slows, income inequality remains high in Author: Sara Hsu. Gender Inequality and Economic Growth in Rural China Rebecca Matthews Department of Sociology, University of Iowa and Victor Nee Cornell University This article joins the debate over the effect of market-driven economic development on women’s work opportunities and household gender inequalities.

It assesses women’s. InChina hosted the Fourth World Conference on Women, which produced the Beijing Platform for Action, a document outlining concrete measures to achieve gender equality week Author: Eileen Otis.

Even after three decades of rapid growth China remains a very rural economy. Despite the continued growth in urbanisation, some % of China's mainland population (or. – The purpose of this paper is to study the long‐run relationship between economic growth and income inequality in China during the pre‐reform (‐) and post‐reform (‐) periods, this will be done via cointegration analysis., – The aim of this paper is to offer a proper answer to the issue of the inequality‐growth nexus by using a cointegrated VAR‐setting Cited by: This is a completely rewritten version of the previous working papers, ‘Inequality and Growth in Rural China: Does Higher Inequality Impede Growth’ (University of Toronto Working Paper no.

June ; and Institute for the Study of Labour (IZA) Discussion PaperSeptember ).Cited by: Although county-specific evidence is quite limited and might not be generalized to other settings, a recent study of the dynamics of inequality and growth in rural China based on growth experience.

This paper examines the growth performance and income inequality in eight Chinese provinces during the period of using the China Health and Nutrition Survey data.

It shows that income grew for all segments of the population, and as a result, poverty incidence has fallen. China has recorded impressive growth over the past twenty years, with a commensurate increase in average living standards.1 However, there is mounting concern that increases in inequality indicate many are being left behind, and not sharing in the fruits of development.2 Indeed, most well-behaved social welfare functions rank unequal distributions below equal ones with the same mean income by:.

Gender Equality in China's Economic Transformation October Every country pursues economic growth and development.

Since the end of the last century, the rural women was only a bit more than half of the income of rural Size: 1MB.Indeed, accompanying China’s robust economic growth is that China has become one of the countries with the largest urban–rural gap in the world.

2 The income gap between rural and urban residents has kept growing. The average income per capita of urban residents increased from times that of rural populations in to in Cited by: 8.Women, Gender and Rural Development in China Tamara Jacka and Sally Sargeson (eds.) Book Review Over the last three decades China has experienced phenomenal growth rates, rapid industrialisation, and fundamental transformation of its socio-economic fabric.

Its soaring economic power has been matched by a spectacular decline in the number of people living below the international .